A Quick Look at the Rarest of Pink Pearls

Pink pearls are a relative rarity, even today. While saltwater varieties of pearl-producing oyster can whip up pink pearls naturally and freshwater pearls can be dyed, you probably won’t find these in pink pearl wedding jewelry. The pink pearl produced by the Queen Conch, the Caribbean pink pearl, could be called the rarest of the rare. The animal itself, from which astounding flaming pink pearls originate, is pretty finicky. Only one near-perfect will be found among every hundred thousand shells. On top of that, the Queen Conch is officially a threatened species, so there aren’t even that many pearl producers in existence!

Every attempt to produce a cultured Queen Conch pearl has failed and so the only pink pearls of this variety are found the old fashioned way. That means that only a few thousand new Caribbean pink pearls make it out of the sea every year, and then only 15% of those are of a high enough quality to be used in jewelry. You can imagine that the price tag for these pearls is pretty steep!

Of course, the pink pearls we offer are the most exquisite cultured freshwater pearls and colored glass pearls versus natural pink pearls – which means every bride can wear pink if she wants to!